Readersforum's Blog

April 9, 2014

Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction: the shortlist

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, author of 'Americanah'

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, author of ‘Americanah’

Six authors from across the globe unveiled on the Women’s Prize for Fiction shortlist, as judges promise they will change the way readers view of the world.

By Hannah Furness.

Readers no longer care where in the world their books are set, insiders have said, as not a single author with full British citizenship features on the Baileys Women’s Prize shortlist for the first time since 1998.

This year’s shortlist features six female writers from across the globe, including novels from US writer Donna Tart, Irish Eimear McBride, and Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

Their works will go up against novels from Australian Hannah Kent, Irish Audrey Magee and Jhumpa Lahiri, who holds dual US and British citizenship after being born in London but moving to America aged just two.

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October 16, 2013

Man Booker Prize 2013: Youngest star Eleanor Catton joins Booker luminaries

Booker Prize winner Eleanor Catton, second left, at a photocall in London last weekend with fellow shortlisted authors, from left, Jhumpa Lahiri, Colm Tóibín, NoViolet Bulawayo and Ruth Ozeki

Booker Prize winner Eleanor Catton, second left, at a photocall in London last weekend with fellow shortlisted authors, from left, Jhumpa Lahiri, Colm Tóibín, NoViolet Bulawayo and Ruth Ozeki

Eleanor Catton wins at the age of 28 with 832-page novel of ‘astonishing maturity’

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Eleanor Catton has become the youngest writer to win the Man Booker Prize, with the longest novel to triumph in the award.

Catton, 28, beat competition from Colm Tóibín, NoViolet Bulawayo, Jhumpa Lahiri, Ruth Ozeki and the favourite, Jim Crace, to be awarded the £50,000 prize by the Duchess of Cornwall at a ceremony in Guildhall in London.

The author began The Luminaries, her second novel, aged 25, and has eclipsed the previous youngest recipient of the award, Ben Okri, who won aged 32 in 1991.

 

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May 4, 2013

Lionel Shriver: social media makes teenagers ‘neurotic’

Filed under: Books — Tags: , , , , — Bookblurb @ 5:50 pm

bigConstant exposure to their own image on social networking sites and camera phones has made teenagers neurotic about food and how they look, the author Lionel Shriver has claimed.

By Hannah Furness

The bestselling writer, whose latest novel Big Brother explores the modern preoccupation with size, said this generation was “hyper conscious” about how it was seen by others.

This was due partly to a “proliferation” of images on cameras in mobile telephones and posted online, constantly showing people what they really look like, she said.

Speaking at the Chipping Norton Literary Festival, she claimed technology meant that teenagers grew up looking at themselves rather than outwards and said parenting was a “minefield”. Shriver, an Orange Prize winner best known for her novel We Need to Talk about Kevin, said weight and size was an issue that affected virtually everyone.

“We have become chronically neurotic about food,” she said. “It may be — and I haven’t really thought about it before — but part of it must be the proliferation of photographs in our lives.

“If you think about it, in the olden days you didn’t see pictures of yourself very often. You might see yourself in the mirror sometimes, but for the most part you looked out.”

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